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fuckyeahratrods:

It isn’t a rat rod, but it is super sick!

1950 Ford F-100

(via 240sxondeck)

Source: fuckyeahratrods
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thepropertyfiles:

THE KILN STUDIOS

I’ve said it before (possibly too many times) and I’ll doubtless say it again, but nothing appeals to me more than a compact house or flat that’s been cleverly designed. If you live in the city centre as I do, then making the most of a tight floor-plan is often the norm. And, too often, smaller properties just have wasted space, whether that’s poorly thought out storage or dead circulation space. So whenever I find a house or flat that answers this well - and this quirky conversion in Edinburgh is a prime example - well, I sit up and take notice.

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Source: thepropertyfiles
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life1nmotion:

GG House / Architekt.Lemanski

Source: life1nmotion
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thepropertyfiles:

LOFT LIVING IN STOCKHOLM

So what does 20 million SEK (that’s around £1,750,000) buy you in the heart of Stockholm? Well, it buys you this: a super-styled and high spec two bedroom loft space in Södermalm, located between Maria Square and Mosebacke Square. To describe this property as generous would be an understatement: think flowing open plan living spaces bathed in natural light thanks to the skylights that punctuate the different zones.

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Source: thepropertyfiles
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camber:

Nissan Silvia S13 @ StanceNation.
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cjwho:

Bridge House, Chile by Aranguiz-Bunster Arquitectos | via

The project is located in an area ​​100 x 50 meters, located in a forest of Ulmos, Melis Myrtles and other native species. It is crossed longitudinally by a stream, modeling the topography of the soil. The stream and its path through the land, generate the general idea of the project.

To cross the stream like a bridge, rescuing the light and transparent language that allows the project to be inserted into the forest without dramatically altering the major components of the environment. The impact on the forest and the stream is minimal.

In the search for the site, we chose an area clear of large trees, where the basin generates a level difference of 2.5 between the two sides. This allowed us to differentiate the supports (two concrete blocks), one as a foundation near the natural ground level (south edge) and the other as a support base on the north side.

The base contains the main access, made of a vestibule that leads to a staircase up to the main level. This volume is structured on two concrete blocks, on which three steel beams with a 12 meter span are anchored and supported. Above them is a frame of beams and double wood columns. Among the columns, double glazed windows use as center or frame the same existing structure.

Photography: Nico Saieh

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(via alwaysinstudio)

Source: cjwho
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cjwho:

Farmhouse Renovation, Moorenweis, Germany by Buero Philipp Moeller | via

The renovation of a farmhouse erected in 1890 in the Fürstenfeldbruck district is focusing on the reorganization of the floor plan, the preservation of the basic structure, particularly the roof truss, and above all the creation of diverse and atmospherically dense interior rooms offering a very special living experience to a family of four.

In order to retain the typical character of a farmhouse consisting of living-dining area and utility rooms, the small room structures on the ground and first floor of the living area remain largely untouched. On the one hand, available or supplementary old objects such as doors, lamps or furniture support this aura. On the other hand, several rooms appear decidedly modern by using carefully matched colours, large wall panelling and fine wallpapers.

Fascinating spatial contrasts are being created by the combination of living area and former cowshed especially in the open attic floors. Black steel components complete or renew the construction of the sand-blasted wooden structure only where it was inevitable, whereas custom-made oiled oak floorboards up to seven meters long and small new fittings are shaping the spatial structure.

Photography: Benjamin A. Monn

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(via arciphilia)

Source: cjwho